Categories
Pensions

What to Do When You’re Behind on Your Retirement Savings

What to Do When You’re Behind on Your Retirement Savings

“It is never too early to encourage long-term savings” ― Ron Lewis

3 min read

Retirement Savings Shortfall: What to Do If You Are Behind

What to Do When You’re Behind on Your Retirement Savings

“It is never too early to encourage long-term savings” ― Ron Lewis

3 min read

Facing a retirement savings shortfall can be daunting, but it’s essential to tackle the issue head-on and take proactive steps to bolster your retirement savings.

Whether you’re nearing retirement age or still have several years left in the workplace, there are strategies you can implement to bridge the gap and secure a comfortable retirement.

Assess Your Current Financial Situation

Naturally, you need to know how far behind you may be!

This means the first step in addressing a retirement savings shortfall is to assess your current financial situation comprehensively.

Take stock of your retirement accounts, including pension plans such as the three Pillars (in Switzerland), your SIPPs or ISAs (in the UK), or 401(k)s or IRAs (in the US), and any other investment vehicles you may have.

Calculate your total savings balance and compare it to your retirement goals to determine the extent of the shortfall.

Additionally, evaluate your current expenses and budget to identify areas where you can cut costs and redirect funds towards retirement savings.

Great, you’ve completed the first step. Now what?

Read below to find out the steps you can take to increase your chances of enjoying a comfortable and enjoyable retirement!

Delaying Retirement

Delaying retirement can be a strategic move that involves extending your working years.

Essentially, this provides you more years to earn income, contribute to your retirement accounts and grow your investments.

Delaying retirement can also increase your State / Social benefits, too, as they are often calculated based upon your earnings history and the age at which you begin to receive them. For each year your State pension is deferred, you will likely find that the benefits you receive could increase by a certain percentage each year (up-to a maximum age set by the country in which you reside).

In parallel to having more years to earn income, you also reduce the number of years you will need to rely on your retirement savings! Thus, you have extra opportunities to pay off debts, such as mortgages or loans, and reinforce your financial situation.

However, whilst this may not be the ideal scenario for everyone, it can be a practical solution for those looking to boost their retirement savings over the long-term.

Additional Income Sources

Exploring additional income sources can be highly effective in bridging the gap caused by a retirement savings shortfall.

This could involve taking on part-time employment, freelancing, or starting a business you can do in addition to your full-time job to generate supplemental income.

By diversifying your income streams, you can increase your overall cash flow and allocate additional funds towards your retirement savings. This in turn can provide a sense of financial security and peace of mind, knowing that you have alternative avenues to support your retirement lifestyle.

Review Retirement Goals

When faced with a retirement savings shortfall, it’s crucial to reassess your retirement goals and expectations.

This involves carefully evaluating your desired retirement lifestyle, including factors such as travel plans, hobbies, healthcare needs, and living arrangements.

This method would include reducing the income you take and your planned expenditure (as listed above).

By undertaking this review, you can identify areas where adjustments may be necessary to align with your ‘financial reality’.

Downsizing or Relocating

Options like downsizing or relocating can be an integral part of alleviating financial strain.

Downsizing involves reducing the size or cost of your current living arrangements, whether by moving to a smaller home, selling excess possessions, or cutting down on unnecessary expenses in this area.

By downsizing, you can free up funds that can be redirected towards bolstering your retirement savings or covering essential expenses.

Relocating to a more affordable area is another strategy to consider as moving to a region with a lower cost of living can stretch your retirement savings further, allowing you to maintain a comfortable lifestyle without depleting your resources too quickly.

Researching potential relocation destinations and assessing factors such as housing affordability, healthcare access, and overall quality of life can help you make an informed decision about whether relocating is a viable solution for your retirement savings shortfall.

Talk to the Experts at Patterson Mills

Overall, it can be a scary thought when facing a retirement savings shortfall. However, with expert assistance from Patterson Mills, you can take the necessary steps to begin correcting your situation with ease.

Remember, we are here to help you navigate the complexities of retirement planning and develop a tailored strategy to achieve your retirement goals.

Get in touch with us today and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting.

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Investments

How Much Money Do You Need to Live Off Dividends?

How Much Money Do You Need to Live Off Dividends?

“And I had an old-fashioned idea that dividends were a good thing” ― James MacArthur

4 min read

Dividends - Income - How Much Money Do You Need To Live Off Dividend Income

How Much Money Do You Need to Live Off Dividends?

“And I had an old-fashioned idea that dividends were a good thing” ― James MacArthur

4 min read

Dividends are an important part of the total return you achieve within your investments. They are also particularly notable for those looking for income stability.

They offer a reward (payment) for investment in a company’s success and can act as a buffer during market downturns, providing a source of income even when capital appreciation is stagnant or negative.

However, despite the benefits, it’s important to recognise that dividends are not a one-size-fits-all solution and may or may not align with your own financial planning. 

Whilst you could prioritise income generation and value the reliability of dividend payments, you may prefer growth and the reinvestment of earnings for long-term capital appreciation.

Whatever you may decide, it’s important to have knowledge! Luckily, that’s what you will find below, so read on!

Dividends: The Basics

Dividends represent a portion of a company’s earnings distributed to its shareholders as a reward for their investment.

These payments are typically made on a regular basis, such as quarterly or annually, and can vary in amount depending on the company’s profitability and dividend policy.

Dividends are often seen as a sign of financial strength and stability, with companies that consistently pay dividends considered reliable investment options in this area.

The “dividend yield” is how much dividend you could expect to receive per share. This is expressed as dividend divided by a share price. For example, this may be 2.50%.

It is important to note that dividends are not guaranteed and can fluctuate based on various factors, including economic conditions, company performance, and management decisions. During periods of financial distress or economic uncertainty, companies may reduce or suspend dividend payments to conserve cash or address operational challenges.

This can lead to disappointment and financial strain should you be relying heavily on dividend income for your living expenses. As such, it is important to carefully assess a company’s dividend sustainability, financial health as well as many other factors.

The Key Advantages

Naturally, one of the main advantages of dividends is their potential to provide a steady stream of income, regardless of market conditions.

Dividend-paying stocks are often viewed as less volatile than non-dividend-paying stocks, offering a degree of stability and predictability to your portfolio. 

Additionally, dividends can provide tax benefits depending where you are tax-resident, as they are often taxed at a lower rate than other forms of investment income, such as interest or capital gains.

You can also get signals of a company’s financial health and management’s confidence in its future prospects. Companies that consistently pay dividends demonstrate a commitment to returning value to shareholders and may be perceived as more reliable and trustworthy investment opportunities.

Dividend payments can also act as a form of discipline for company management, encouraging diligent capital allocation and discouraging wasteful spending or risky investments.

Uncovering The Disadvantages

Despite their appeal, dividends do come with their share of drawbacks.

  1. Unlike interest payments on bonds, dividends are not guaranteed and can be reduced or suspended altogether if a company’s financial performance deteriorates. 
  2. Furthermore, dividend payments can fluctuate with changes in the company’s earnings or stock price, making them less reliable than you might first think. 
  3. Companies that prioritise paying dividends may have fewer resources available for reinvestment in growth initiatives, potentially limiting their long-term growth prospects.
  4. Dividend income may not keep pace with inflation over time, reducing its purchasing power and eroding the real value of your returns, particularly in environments with high inflation rates.
  5. Investing in dividend-paying stocks may also limit your ability to diversify your portfolio across different asset classes or pursue alternative investment strategies which could lead you to missing out on higher returns elsewhere.

How Much Do You Need To Live Off Dividends?

So, what is the answer to the question of how much you need to live off dividends?

Well, it will (hopefully) come as no surprise that of course it depends on how much income you require!

If you are considering a dividend-focused strategy, you should carefully assess your income needs and risk tolerance.

For example, if you require an income of 100’000 per year and were looking at a dividend yield of 10%, you would need to invest 1’000’000.

To work out much you need, calculate your required income and then the percentage dividend yield you may be able to achieve.

From here, you can find out what initial investment you would need to achieve that percentage return and therefore the income level you desire.

The example above is a useful way of looking at this.

What Are The Next Steps?

Whilst dividends can be an attractive option when seeking income, it’s crucial to weigh the pros and cons carefully and consider how dividends fit into your overall investment strategy.

Yes, it can be complex, and that is exactly why the next steps are to get in touch with Patterson Mills! We understand the complexities of dividend investing and offer expert guidance to help you navigate the world of dividends and achieve your financial goals.

With our expertise and experience, we can help you make the investment choices that give you the best possible chance of success. Get in touch with us today and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting.

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Investments

OEICs and SICAVs: Exploring Investment Fund Structures

OEICs and SICAVs: Exploring Investment Fund Structures

“Invest for the long haul. Don’t get too greedy and don’t get too scared” ― Shelby M.C. Davis

4 min read

OIECs / SICAVs Structure of Investment Funds

OEICs and SICAVs: Exploring Investment Fund Structures

“Invest for the long haul. Don’t get too greedy and don’t get too scared” ― Shelby M.C. Davis

4 min read

The vast amount of differing fund structures available when you are looking to invest can be daunting. One such structure that you will likely see is the ‘Open-Ended Investment Company’ (OEIC), also known as the ‘Société d’Investissement à Capital Variable’ (SICAV) in some jurisdictions.

Unlike traditional mutual funds, which are common in the United States, OEICs and SICAVs are prevalent in Europe and other regions. 

OEICs and SICAVs offer several advantages over other investment vehicles. Their open-ended nature allows investors to buy and sell shares at the prevailing Net Asset Value (NAV) per share, ensuring liquidity and transparency. Additionally, these structures provide access to a wide range of asset classes and investment strategies, catering to various risk appetites and investment goals. As global financial markets continue to evolve, OEICs and SICAVs remain popular choices for those seeking exposure to international markets and professional fund management expertise.

Keen to know more? You are in the right place!

What is an OEIC (or SICAV) Investment Fund Structure?

An OEIC (or SICAV) is a collective investment scheme that pools money from multiple investors to invest in a diversified portfolio of assets. Unlike closed-end funds, which have a fixed number of shares traded on exchanges, OEICs and SICAVs are open-ended, meaning they issue and redeem shares based on demand.

This structure allows you to buy and sell shares at the fund’s Net Asset Value (NAV) per share, which is calculated daily based on the value of the fund’s underlying assets.

Key Features of OEICs and SICAVs

  1. Diversification: OEICs and SICAVs offer access to a wide range of assets, including stocks, bonds, and other securities, providing diversification benefits to mitigate risk.
  2. Liquidity: Buying and selling shares in OEICs and SICAVs on a daily basis provides liquidity and flexibility when managing investment portfolios.
  3. Professional Management: These investment funds are typically managed by professional fund managers who make investment decisions based on the fund’s objectives and investment strategy.
  4. Regulation: OEICs and SICAVs are subject to regulatory oversight by financial authorities in their respective jurisdictions, which helps add a level of protection and transparency.
  5. Tax Efficiency: OEICs and SICAVs often benefit from tax-efficient structures, which can result in lower tax liabilities compared to direct investment in securities.
  6. Investor Protection: Both OEICs and SICAVs are regulated investment structures, offering protection through compliance with regulatory requirements and standards.
  7. Global Access: OEICs and SICAVs provide access to a diverse range of international markets and asset classes, allowing for global investment opportunities and portfolio diversification.

Net Asset Value (NAV) Explained

So, you can trade assets at the fund’s “Net Asset Value”, but what does this mean?

Well, Net Asset Value (NAV) per share, is a measure used to determine the value of each share in a mutual fund, exchange-traded fund (ETF), or other investment vehicle. It is calculated by dividing the total net asset value of the fund by the number of shares outstanding.

The net asset value (NAV) of a fund represents the total value of all the fund’s assets, including cash, securities, and other investments, minus any liabilities such as expenses or debts. By dividing this total value by the number of shares outstanding, the NAV per share reflects the value that each individual share represents.

NAV per share is typically calculated at the end of each trading day or at regular intervals determined by the fund’s management. Investors use NAV per share as a reference point to determine the fair market value of their investment and to track the performance of the fund over time. It is important to note that NAV per share can fluctuate based on changes in the value of the fund’s underlying assets and liabilities.

Let’s say the fund has the following assets and liabilities:

Total value of assets (stocks, bonds, cash, etc.): 10’000’000

Total value of liabilities (expenses, debts, etc.): 1’000’000

Number of shares outstanding: 500’000

To calculate the NAV per share, you would follow these steps:

  1. Subtract the total liabilities from the total assets to determine the net asset value (NAV) of the fund: NAV = Total assets – Total liabilities = 10’000’000 – 1’000’000 = 9,000,000

  2. Divide the NAV by the number of shares outstanding to find the NAV per share: NAV per share = NAV / Number of shares outstanding = 9’000’000 / 500’000 = 18

What Now?

Overall, understanding the structure and mechanics of OEICs and SICAVs is an important step for those looking to diversify their portfolios.

So, what now? Patterson Mills specialise in navigating the complexities of investment funds like OEICs and SICAVs. 

With our expertise and experience, we can help you make the investment choices that give you the best possible chance of success. Don’t wait any longer to optimise your investment strategy – get in touch with us and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting.

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Pensions

Understanding Your Retirement Requirements

Understanding Your Retirement Requirements

“Today people have to be self-reliant if they want a secure retirement income” ― Scott Cook

4 min read

Pension Retirement Requirements

Understanding Your Retirement Requirements

“Today people have to be self-reliant if they want a secure retirement income” ― Scott Cook

4 min read

Retirement planning is a crucial aspect of your financial management, yet it often has many misconceptions and unecessary complexities that can hinder people’s progress in ensuring a they can enjoy a comfortable and worry-free retirement.

Today, we are going to take a look at the intricacies of pension planning, aiming to provide clarity and understanding as to what your own retirement requirements may be.

It’s not just about saving money or having the largest pension fund you can get; it’s about envisioning and actively working towards the kind of retirement lifestyle you desire.

This may well include accruing the largest pension fund you are able, though it also requires making strategic decisions about your finances, health, living arrangements, and leisure activities.

With a comprehensive review of these factors, Patterson Mills are able to formulate a retirement plan that not only sustains you financially, but also supports your overall wellbeing and happiness in your golden years.

Evaluating Your Current Financial Situation

The first step in this process is to assess your current financial position. 

This involves evaluating your income, expenses, savings, investments, and any existing pension provisions you may have. Understanding this information allows you to set realistic retirement goals and devise a tailored pension strategy.

You might also spot any areas for improvement or potential obstacles to achieving your retirement goals that you did not even know were there! In essence, gaining clarity on your financial position can help you make informed decisions and take proactive steps to secure your financial future.

Setting Retirement Goals

Setting clear and achievable retirement goals is a great idea when it comes to effective pension planning.

Consider factors such as your desired retirement age, lifestyle aspirations, healthcare needs, and potential legacy plans.

Moreover, it’s crucial to factor in inflation and a potential rise in the cost of living when setting retirement goals. Whilst it may be challenging to estimate future expenses, incorporating inflation figures (or at least, estimated / average inflation figures) into your calculations ensures that your retirement savings will adequately cover your lifestyle needs and expenses over time. 

Additonally, be realistic about your retirement goals! There is no point in setting yourself a goal that might be near-impossible to achieve as it may needlessly negatively impact your mindset when approaching retirement planning.

Periodically reassessing your retirement goals and adjusting your pension plan accordingly is also necessary as your circumstances evolve. Life events such as marriage, parenthood, career changes, or unexpected expenses may necessitate modifications to your retirement strategy and ultimate retirement goals.

Pension Contribution Strategies

Once you’ve evaluated your current financial situation and defined your retirement goals, it’s time to implement a pension contribution strategy (i.e. putting some savings aside!).

This involves determining how much you need to save regularly to achieve your desired retirement income. Explore options such as employer-matched contributions, voluntary contributions, and tax-efficient pension schemes to maximise your savings potential.

You could also automate your pension contributions to ensure consistency and discipline in your saving habits. Setting up automatic transfers from your salary or bank account to your pension fund can streamline the saving process and prevent procrastination or impulsive spending.

As you progress in your career or experience changes in your financial situation, you could also consider increasing your pension contributions accordingly.

Aiming to contribute a percentage of your income, for example around 10% or more, towards your pension fund can help you stay on track towards your retirement goals. When adopting a proactive approach to pension contributions and regularly reassessing your saving strategy, you can enhance the growth of your retirement nest egg and ensure a comfortable financial future.

Who Do You Talk To?

Now you understand the very basics of how you can implement a solid retirement planning strategy and navigate the complexities with ease. However, this article is just scratching the surface.

It is far easier said than done when formulating and implementing such plans, but fear not! Patterson Mills are your specialists in all things retirement planning and we are here to guide you through every step of the process.

From assessing your financial situation to designing a tailored pension strategy, we will ensure that you are able to make informed decisions and have the best possible chance of achieving your retirement goals. 

Don’t let uncertainty hold you back from planning for your future — get in touch with us and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting. Take control of your retirement journey, today!

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Opinion

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on Finance

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on Finance

“Technology, through automation and artificial intelligence, is definitely one of the most disruptive sources” ― Alain Dehaze

3 min read

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) on Finance

“Mutual funds were created to make investing easy, so consumers wouldn’t have to be burdened with picking individual stocks” ― Alain Dehaze

3 min read

Artificial intelligence (AI) is reshaping how people see and interact with the world, and the Finance industry is no exception to this.

Already, we are witnessing new ways of writing about financial markets and ways of streamlining data analysis processes on a massive scale in just the blink of an eye. With its ability to process such vast amounts of data at such high speeds, whilst also then having the ability to make complex decisions, AI is transforming various aspects of finance, from investment management to risk assessment and customer service.

How is AI doing this? Find out below!

The Impacts on Investment Management

When we look at impacts on investment management, we can see that artificial intelligence (AI) is changing how analytics are used to identify patterns, forecast market trends, and refine investment strategies. These AI algorithms are able to formulate data-driven patterns and correlations that human analysts may overlook.

This could lead to fund managers and investment analysts making better informed decisions, leading to enhanced portfolio performance. However, whilst AI processes are very useful in such cases, it is important to retain a human element as relying on AI algorithms (or any algorithms for that matter) can come with issues that are often realised too late.

Such issues can include their predictive capabilities being manipulated or potentially producing the wrong answer that results in a negative return. Whilst not the norm, these potential risks should be recognised and protected against.

Improving Customer Experience

You may notice when visiting various websites that a key way AI is improving the customer experience is through the implementation of chatbots and virtual assistants. The financial sector is no exception to this and you could well be chatting to an AI bot when visiting investment websites!

These AI-driven tools are able to stay awake when a human counterpart cannot, providing 24/7 support and thus improved customer satisfcation and operational efficiency.

Such virtual agents can handle routine enquiries, transactions and even engage in potentially meaningful conversations by addressing customer queries promptly and accurately. In addition, AI systems can allow humans to spend more time on more complex issues, streamlining operations and reducing costs.

Strengthening Risk Management

AI-powered risk management systems analyse real-time market data to identify potential threats and implement proactive risk mitigation measures. Detection of such anomalies and enhancing fraud detection can protect financial institutions against fraudulent activities.

Furthermore, AI enables financial institutions to conduct more accurate and comprehensive risk assessments by, as mentioned already, analysing vast amounts of data from various sources. Such an approach to risk management can allow organisations to anticipate and mitigate potential threats before they escalate, thereby safeguarding assets and maintaining stability in the financial markets.

Facilitating Regulatory Compliance

AI can play an important role in ensuring regulatory compliance within the financial industry. By monitoring vast amounts of data and analysing transactions, AI algorithms can help financial institutions adhere to evolving regulatory requirements, reducing the risk of non-compliance penalties and enhancing transparency.

By streamlining the process, corrective action can be taken promptly, ensuring continued compliance and meeting of regulatory standards. By automating compliance procedures, AI not only reduces the burden on compliance teams but also minimises the likelihood of human error, ensuring accuracy and consistency in regulatory reporting.

It is also possible for AI-powered compliance tools to adapt to changes in regulations more efficiently than traditional manual methods. Machine learning algorithms can quickly incorporate updates to regulatory frameworks, ensuring that financial institutions remain up-to-date and compliant with the latest standards. This agility in regulatory compliance can help navigate complex regulatory landscapes more effectively, mitigating the risk of regulatory fines and reputational damage while maintaining the trust of Clients and customers.

Robot Revolution or Handy Companion?

It would likely be inadvisable to rely 100% on AI processes throughout your business, day-to-day life or any other circumstances. Hence, it is probable that human operators will be necessary going forward.

This means that AI is able to complement the day-to-day tasks of professionals in the finance sector and enhance the services that are able to be provided to Clients.

However, AI is not right for everyone! There are certainly downsides to using AI, including a potential lack of personalisation, potential for manipulation and more. Certain areas may require the diligent attention of a human and are potentially outside of the remit of AI.

As with stock markets, the future cannot be known and AI will likely continue to develop over the coming years.

With Patterson Mills, you can be sure of a 100% human service, tailored to you. So, get in touch with us and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting and talk to one of our Advisers today!

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Investments

Re-Invest Or Withdraw? Accumulation Versus Income Funds

Re-Invest Or Withdraw? Accumulation Versus Income Funds

“Mutual funds were created to make investing easy, so consumers wouldn’t have to be burdened with picking individual stocks” ― Scott Cook

3 min read

Dividend Investing vs. Income Withdrawals - Accumulation - Compounding - Investments

Re-Invest Or Withdraw? Accumulation Versus Income Funds

“Mutual funds were created to make investing easy, so consumers wouldn’t have to be burdened with picking individual stocks” ― Scott Cook

3 min read

Within the world of mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), you will often have the choice to opt for accumulation or income.

What’s the difference you may ask?

Put simply, accumulation funds re-invest any income or dividends generated by the underlying assets back into the fund.

On the other hand, income funds distribute any income generated by the underlying assets to you, the investor. This is often in the form of cash dividends or interest payments.

However, just knowing what these are is not necessarily enough to make informed decisions on your investments. Which type is suitable for you? What are the benefits? Read on to find out!

Accumulation Funds

Accumulation funds, often shortened to ‘Acc’ or known as ‘capital growth’ funds, are designed for those who wish to re-invest any income back into the fund in which they are invested.

With this type of investment, the process is automatic and any dividends, interest payments or other distribution types will be re-invested without you having to do anything (at least, nothing beyond buying into the fund in the first place!).

Why might you wish to do this? Because you will benefit from compound growth over time that could have a huge impact on the gains you see when you come to withdraw in the future!

As an example, should you have CHF 1’000 invested and receive a CHF 100 distribution (e.g. as a dividend payment), you would then have CHF 1’100 invested (if you did not take it as income). This is CHF 100 more that can potentially increase both your returns and even future distribution payments.

The longer you leave your funds, the more time this type of approach has to grow your wealth. Hence, this strategy is typically better-suited if you have a longer-term investment horizon and prioritise capital appreciation.

Income Funds

Income funds, you will not be surprised to read, are also sometimes known under another name!

Not only are the often shortened to ‘Inc’, they are alternatively known as ‘distribution’ funds (sometimes shortened to ‘Dist’). As mentioned, these types of investment provide regular income paid out as dividends, interest or through other means.

Income funds are generally more suitable for when you are retired or if you are relying on investment income to cover defined living expenses.

Naturally, this makes the key advantage of income funds exactly that: their ability to provide a steady stream of income. 

What’s more, this income is provided to you without the need to sell off your shares!

Which One Is Right For You?

Now you know what both types of funds are, who they may be more suitable for and how they could benefit you.

This then leaves the question: which one should you choose?

Naturally, each of you reading this will be unique and there is no one-size-fits-all answer.

So, when deciding between accumulation or income funds, consider your investment objectives, risk tolerance and income needs. If you have quite some time before you wish to access your investments, you may be more suited to accumulation funds. On the other hand, income funds provide a regular income that you may prefer.

However, in both cases, assess any tax implications, fees and the benefits you may receive from compounding, or the potential drawbacks if you take the income out of the investment.

Here For You

There are more considerations than those which are in this article, and so you are must do your own research before making any decisions.

Yes, it can be complex, but Patterson Mills are here to help and explain your options in a jargon-free manner that ensures your complete understanding of your most effective route forward.

So, get in touch with Patterson Mills and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting. Your future financial success is our priority!

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.

Categories
Financial Planning

How to Teach Your Kids About Money

How to Teach Your Kids About Money

“Financial literacy lessons should be introduced at an early stage of schooling. Basic concepts like budgeting, saving, and the importance of credit should be integrated into the curriculum” ― Linsey Mills

3 min read

Relationship With Money - How Do You Make Financial Decisions

How to Teach Your Kids About Money

“Financial literacy lessons should be introduced at an early stage of schooling. Basic concepts like budgeting, saving, and the importance of credit should be integrated into the curriculum” ― Linsey Mills

3 min read

As parents, one of the greatest gifts we can give our children is the knowledge and skills to navigate the world of money with confidence. Teaching kids about money from a young age sets the foundation for a lifetime of financial responsibility and success.

Today, we are providing you with the top 5 areas to start with to improve your children’s financial literacy.

Start Early with Basic Concepts

Introducing basic money concepts to children as early as 3- to 5- years of age can be highly beneficial to a child’s development.

Of course, this does not mean showing them online courses or 45-minute videos, but you can use everyday experiences like shopping trips or providing an allowance to teach them about coins, notes, and simple transactions. This engages them in counting money, distinguishing between different currency amounts, and understanding the value of each.

Another helpful tool is to utilise hands-on learning by allowing your children to handle coins and notes, fostering a tangible understanding of currency. Should this become part of their daily or weekly routine, children can develop a strong foundation that sets them up well for the future.

Teach the Importance of Saving

Accumulating savings is an important aspect of financial success. If you provide an allowance, emphasise the importance of saving a proportion for short-term and long-term goals. For a child, this is likely to be for items such as toys, gadget or perhaps more longer-term goals like future education expenses.

Provide them with piggy banks or clear jars to visually track their savings progress, too. Teach them the concept of delayed gratification by setting goals and rewarding them when they achieve them through saving. Making the process fun and visual is a great way to keep your children interested in the topic!

Additionally, involve your children in decision-making processes when it comes to spending and saving. For example, when they receive money as a gift, discuss with them the options of spending it immediately versus saving it for something they truly desire. This encourages them to think before they spend and make informed choices whilst also developing a sense of ownership over their own financial decisions.

Make Learning Fun with Games and Activities

Create games and activities, and use interactive tools to make learning about money enjoyable for kids. For example, board games like Monopoly or The Game of Life offer opportunities to teach concepts like budgeting, investing, and risk management in a playful manner.

You also have access to online resources, apps, and educational websites that can provide engaging ways to learn about money management and won’t take up 3- to 6-hours of your weekend!

Moreover, consider planning family activities that involve financial decision-making, such as planning a budget-friendly outing or setting up a pretend shop at home where children can practice buying and selling items using play money. Hands-on experiences like these not only reinforce essential basic financial concepts but also promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and teamwork skills in a fun way that they are more likely to remember.

Practice Responsible Spending

Teach your children the value of responsible spending by involving them in (age-appropriate) decision-making processes. Give them opportunities to make choices about spending their allowance or gift money, emphasising the importance of needs versus wants and prioritising purchases. Compare shopping styles and discuss the impacts of impulsive buying.

You could even consider implementing a ‘savings matching’ scheme where you match a percentage of your child’s savings contributions, incentivising them to save more and spend wisely. This not only reinforces the habit of saving but also teaches the concept of delayed gratification and the rewards of positive financial behaviour.

As your children become more financially literate, gradually introduce them to more complex topics like budgeting for larger expenses and understanding the impact of interest rates on loans and savings.

Lead by Example

Perhaps the most important point in this article and one of the best ways to teach your kids about money is by modeling responsible financial behaviours yourself.

Be transparent about money matters, involve children in family financial discussions, and demonstrate responsible financial habits like budgeting, saving, and investing. Use real-life examples to illustrate financial concepts and reinforce the importance of smart money management.

Explain the decisions you make and the reasons behind them, showing them practical applications of good financial principles. By seeing your financial decisions first-hand and understanding the rationale behind them, children can develop a deeper appreciation for the value of money and the importance of making informed choices.

Start Educating Early

Teaching children about money from an early age is one of the greatest gifts you can give for their future financial success. You are able to instill habits that will last throughout their lives and enhance their decision making immensely.

With Patterson Mills, we provide various resources and guidance that can assist you in teaching your children about money. In fact, for our private Clients, you can even bring them along to a meeting if you wish!

The main point to take from this article is that a financial education is invaluable for your children and, together, we can assist the next generation in achieving achieve financial independence and success.

So, get in touch with Patterson Mills and book your initial, no-cost and no-obligation meeting. Both you and your children will be glad that you did.

Send us an e-mail to contactus@pattersonmills.ch or call us direct at +41 21 801 36 84 and we shall be pleased to assist you.

Please note that all content within this article has been prepared for information purposes only. This article does not constitute financial, legal or tax advice. Always ensure you speak to a regulated Financial Adviser before making any financial decisions.